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A History of the Mishnaic Law of Appointed Times (5 vols.)

By Jacob Neusner / Wipf & Stock / 2007

$94.99

Print: $148.00

Overview

Renowned scholar of Judaic studies, Jacob Neusner, examines the Mishnaic law of Appointed Times in this comprehensive five-part collection. These volumes offer invaluable insight into events in rabbinic tradition such as Passover and the Festival of Tabernacles. In the first four parts, Neusner provides an in-depth analysis of each chapter within the Mishnah tractates of the law of Appointed Times. In the fifth and final part, he concludes his research of these laws by explaining how they formed and changed over time.

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For more on Jewish history, check out A History of the Jewish People in the Time of Christ.

Looking for more from distinguished Jewish scholar Jacob Neusner? Try the Jacob Neusner Jewish Studies Bundle, 99 volumes on Jewish history, religion, philosophy, and more.

Key Features

  • Offers translations and explanations of each of the tractates in the Mishnaic law of Appointed Times
  • Gathers extensive research from primary sources
  • Includes detailed appendices, bibliographies, and lists of abbreviations and transliterations

Product Details

  • Title: A History of the Mishnaic Law of Appointed Times
  • Editor: Jacob Neusner
  • Series: Studies in Judaism in Late Antiquity
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Volumes: 5
  • Pages: 1,340
  • Resource Type: Monographs
  • Topic: Judaica

Individual Titles

A History of the Mishnaic Law of Appointed Times, Part 1: Shabbat: Translation and Explanation

  • Editor: Jacob Neusner
  • Series: Studies in Judaism in Late Antiquity
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 244

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This is the first of a five-part presentation of the Mishnaic law of Appointed Times. Jacob Neusner provides a translation and explanation of Shabbat, the Mishnah-tractate that deals with the Sabbath. Neusner examines Shabbat chapter by chapter, comparing the themes in the Shabbat with those found in other Mishnah tractates and other passages of Scripture.

A History of the Mishnaic Law of Appointed Times, Part 2: Erubin, Pesahim: Translation and Explanation

  • Editor: Jacob Neusner
  • Series: Studies in Judaism in Late Antiquity
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 312

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this second part of Jacob Neusner’s presentation of the Mishnaic law of Appointed Times, he provides a translation and explanation of Erubin, the Mishnah-tractate that deals with the Sabbath requirement to refrain from leaving one’s abode, and the Pesahim, the Mishnah-tractate concerning laws dealing with the Passover festival. Neusner examines both Erubin and Pesahim chapter by chapter, comparing the themes in these two tractates with those found in other Mishnah tractates and other Scripture.

A History of the Mishnaic Law of Appointed Times, Part 3: Sheqalim, Yoma, Sukkah: Translation and Explanation

  • Editor: Jacob Neusner
  • Series: Studies in Judaism in Late Antiquity
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 216

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This is the third of a five-part presentation of the Mishnaic law of Appointed Times. Jacob Neusner provides a translation and explanation of three different Mishnah-tractates: Sheqalim, Yoma, and Sukkah. Sheqalim pertains to the collection of the sheqel-tax—a poll tax owed by Israelite males. Yoma is a narrative about the way in which the high priest spends the week before the Day of Atonement. Sukkah deals with the feast of tabernacles. Neusner examines these three tractates chapter by chapter, comparing the themes in them with those found in other Mishnah tractates and other Scripture.

A History of the Mishnaic Law of Appointed Times, Part 4: Besah, Rosh Hashanah, Taanit, Megillah, Moed Qatan, Hagigah: Translation and Explanation

  • Editor: Jacob Neusner
  • Series: Studies in Judaism in Late Antiquity
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In the fourth part of Jacob Neusner’s presentation of the Mishnaic law of Appointed Times, Neusner provides a translation and explanation of the following Mishnah tractates: Besah, Rosh Hashshanah, Taanit, Megillah, Moed Qatan, and Hagigah. Besah pertains to the preparation of food for festival days. Rosh Hashshanah deals with the marking of the New Year. Taanit concerns the fasting that occurs when the rains fail to come in their season. Megillah pertains to the reading of the Esther scroll on Purim. Moed Qatan concerns the intermediate days of Passover and the Festival of Tabernacles. Hagigah deals with the participation of common folk in the temple cult during the three pilgrim festivals. Neusner examines these tractates chapter by chapter, comparing the themes in them with those found in other Mishnah tractates and other Scripture.

A History of the Mishnaic Law of Appointed Times, Part 5: The Mishnaic System of Appointed Times

  • Editor: Jacob Neusner
  • Series: Studies in Judaism in Late Antiquity
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 280

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Concluding his five-part presentation of the Mishnaic law of Appointed Times, Jacob Neusner analyzes the system as a whole and describes the formation of each tractate—from Shabbat to Hagigah. Neusner then outlines the Mishnaic law of Appointed Times over the course of various time periods, such as the Time of the Temple and the period of Yavneh from 70 to 120 A.D.

About Jacob Neusner

Jacob Neusner is research professor of theology and senior fellow of the Institute of Advanced Theology at Bard College.